Diabetes in Dogs and Cats

Elmhurst Animal Care Center pic
Elmhurst Animal Care Center
Image: elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com

Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince earned his veterinary degree in 1984 from the University of Illinois. Certified by the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners as a canine and feline specialist, he serves as a partner at the Elmhurst Animal Care Center outside of Chicago. Many of the disorders for which Dr. Todd Prince treats dogs and cats are similar or even identical to human ailments, including, among others, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy, hypertension, and diabetes.

Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder related to insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas that cells use to convert glucose in the blood to energy. Type I diabetes is characterized by the body’s insufficient production of insulin, including an inability to produce the hormone at all. Type II diabetes occurs when the body does produce insulin but the cells don’t use it properly.

Type II diabetes among humans is a major public health concern in the U.S. It’s also becoming more common among dogs and cats. In 1970, about 1 in 1,250 cats was diagnosed with diabetes, and about 1 in 500 dogs had the disease. By the turn of the century, the incidence of diabetes had increased to about 1 in 81 in cats and about 1 in 166 in dogs.

Typical symptoms of diabetes in dogs and cats include an increase in hunger, thirst, and urination, irritability, vision problems, increased fatigue, and unexplained loss of weight. Pet owners who observe these symptoms in their dogs or cats should have them examined by their veterinarian, who has several tests available to diagnose the disease.

Diabetes in dogs and cats is treated much the same as it is in humans, first by modifying the diet to one low in carbohydrates and high in fiber and protein, and instituting an exercise and weight program. Other treatment options include oral medications and injected insulin.

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Tips for Preventing Colic in Dogs

Elmhurst Animal Care Center pic
Elmhurst Animal Care Center
Image: elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com

Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince works as a small animal veterinarian at the Elmhurst Animal Care Center in Elmhurst, Illinois. A board-certified small animal vet, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is capable of treating a wide range of illnesses in dogs, cats, reptiles, and birds.

Colic, which refers to pain and discomfort in the abdomen, is a condition that can affect dogs of any age, though it is most commonly seen in puppies. While many cases of canine colic are mild, it can sometimes be fatal. Dog owners can take the steps below to help prevent colic in their canine companions.

Ensuring that a dog has a healthy, balanced diet is crucial for colic prevention. When an owner adjusts a dog’s food intake, the changes should be made slowly, usually over the course of five to seven days, so that the dog has time to adapt. It isn’t unusual for the family dog to enjoy some leftovers from the dinner table, but owners should be sure dogs aren’t getting too much greasy or sugary human food. These foods can be tricky for a dog’s digestive system to handle, which can quickly lead to colic.

Dog owners should make sure that their pets are checked for worms on a routine basis. Intestinal worms can lead to a host of digestive complications, including colic. If a dog has worms, a veterinarian can run tests and then prescribe medicines to eradicate the worms from the animal’s system.

An Introduction to the Doberman Pinscher

Doberman Pinscher pic
Doberman Pinscher
Image: akc.org

Board-certified veterinarian Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has been in practice for over 25 years and currently treats companion animals at several veterinary clinics in northeastern Illinois. In his free time, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince enjoys spending time with his family and his two dogs, a Boston terrier named Bella and a Doberman Pinscher named Del.

Although they once had a reputation for being aggressive, the Doberman Pinscher is a loving dog that makes an excellent family pet. Developed in Germany in the late 1800s, the Doberman was originally bred to serve as a guard dog. The Doberman’s innate intelligence, alertness, and loyalty continue to make it a great working dog, and the breed is often employed to assist the police, military, and those with vision impairments.

As a pet, Dobermans stand out for the loyalty and affection they show their owner. They are also highly trainable and relatively easy to care for, but they do require a lot of exercise to maintain their athletic physique and promote their overall well-being. A fairly common household pet, the Doberman Pinscher is now the 14th most popular dog breed, according to the American Kennel Club.