Preventing Parasites in Dogs

 

Parasites in Dogs pic
Parasites in Dogs
Image: petmd.com

As a board-certified small-animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince cares for dogs and cats in and around Elmhurst, Illinois. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince believes in preventive care, which includes guarding against internal parasites.

The prevention of internal parasites requires both owner diligence and regular veterinary care. Dog owners should connect with a local veterinarian to learn what parasites are common in their geographic area and what they should do to protect their dogs.

Many veterinarians conduct a fecal check on a dog’s first appointment and each year afterward. If the animal is at a high risk of parasites, the vet may recommend that the dog regularly take a preventive medication.

At home, owners need to prevent their dogs from eating feces, a canine habit that can cause the animals to take in parasites. Owners should keep their yards free of feces and keep their dogs away from standing water, which can breed parasites that cause severe digestive upset in dogs.

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Caring for a New Siberian Husky

 

Siberian Husky pic
Siberian Husky
Image: akc.org

An experienced veterinarian and a Diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince treats animals at a number of Illinois-based clinics, including Elmhurst Animal Care Center. In his work, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince treats all types of animals and helps owners learn to properly care for their pets.

Siberian Huskies make wonderful pets, but there are some essential elements to caring for them. During the first few weeks, the Siberian Husky puppy should receive three meals per day.

At somewhere between 12 and 16 weeks, the puppy won’t be as interested in its midday meal and should be weaned off it. The remaining two meals should be given at set times rather than allowing the puppy to “free feed” any time it wants to eat.

Huskies tend to be very clean animals with regular self-grooming habits. Bathing the dog is generally not necessary, but weekly brushing is important to keep the Husky’s coat healthy and reduce shedding.

What Causes Swollen and Bleeding Gums in Dogs?

Bleeding Gums  pic
Bleeding Gums
Image: webmd.com

A small animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince holds diplomate status with the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince treats animals at four clinics throughout Illinois, including Elmhurst Animal Care Center.

A full-service veterinary clinic, Elmhurst Animal Care Center is accredited by the Better Business Bureau and provides preventive care in addition to specialized services such as laser therapy, emergency services, and dental care.

Elmhurst Animal Care Center recommends dental exams for dogs who experience bad breath, missing teeth, loss of appetite, difficulty eating, or swollen or bleeding gums. Often, swollen or bleeding gums are due to poor oral health or periodontal disease. However, injuries from chewing toys or food can cause these symptoms as well. Further, consumption of toxic foods such as chocolate can also cause bleeding, as can other systemic diseases.

At Elmhurst Animal Care Center, doctors address oral health through an annual exam and regular cleanings.

Strategies for Protecting Dogs’ Joints

Dogs pic
Dogs
Image: petmd.com

Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has been practicing veterinary medicine for nearly 30 years. Board-certified in small animal care, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince maintains a particular focus on orthopedic care.

Dogs need their joints to stay healthy and whole so that they can run and jump without pain or hindrance, but the structures and the tissues that protect them can degrade with time, just like those in humans. Dog owners can help to counteract this process by making sure that their pets get plenty of exercise, particularly in their formative years (provided that this exercise is not so forceful that the dog is subject to injury).

Owners must also ensure that their dogs get all of the nutrients that they need to keep their joints strong. These nutrients occur naturally in a raw diet that contains bone matter, but most commercial dog foods today do not fall into this category. This being the case, supplements of glucosamine and hyaluronic acid can help to keep joints lubricated, while chondroitin supplements can support the repair of crucial cartilage.

Even with supplements, dogs need nutritious food in the correct quantities to prevent obesity, which can strain joints. If joints do become damaged, however, owners should seek treatment for their pets immediately to prevent worsening of the condition in both the short and the long term. This involves not only veterinary care but also adapting the environment, including the introduction of pet stairs and ramps if necessary, so that the dog can rest its joints as much as possible during recovery periods.

Signs of Polyneuropathy in Canines

Polyneuropathy  pic
Polyneuropathy
Image: petmd.com

A University of Illinois alumnus, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has practiced veterinary medicine since 1984. A partner at Elmhurst Animal Care Center, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince practices preventive care and has expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders in dogs.

A neurological disorder is a condition that can affect a dog’s brain, nerves, and spinal cord. These disorders, and the ensuing dysfunction, are typically due to an injury or infection of the central or peripheral nervous systems.

Also known as peripheral neuropathy, polyneuropathy is an example of a neurological disorder that affects the peripheral nervous system. Signs of the condition can be varied since peripheral nerves extend throughout a dog’s body. Symptoms include the loss of motor skills, such as reflexes, and low muscle tone. Disorientation, dizziness, and dysfunction of the pain and pleasure receptors can also occur. Moreover, the thyroid gland can be affected, which is sometimes evident by paralysis of the face, throat, esophagus, and voice box.

What Does it Means When Dogs Lick Ears?

dog licking ears

 

Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is a partner at Elmhurst Animal Care Center in Elmhurst, Illinois. In this role, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince provides preventative care services and other treatments for a variety of pets. The team at Elmhurst Animal Care Center works with patients to help them understand dog behaviors, especially strange ones like licking ears.

Ear-licking behavior is largely motivated by a dog’s pack mentality. Licking ears expresses affection, respects, and dedication to the pack through mutual grooming. At the same time, other factors contribute to this behavior, such as a predilection for flavor of earwax. Dogs often use their tongues to explore the environment, and they can learn that it is a flavor they enjoy.

If a dog suddenly becomes obsessed with another dog’s ear, owners should take note since an ear infection or some other discharge could be the reason.

In general, licking ears is harmless. However, excessive licking can case moisture to build in the ear canal, which leads to other issues. For that reason, owners should discourage the behavior by using distractions like toys or treats to break a dog’s concentration.

Peripheral Neuropathy in Dogs

Peripheral Neuropathy pic
Peripheral Neuropathy
Image: petmd.com

As a DVM, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has been practicing veterinary medicine since 1984. Additionally, he is active with several associations, including the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association, and the Chicago Veterinary Medical Association. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince’s primary interests are soft tissue and orthopedic surgical procedures, oncology, and neurological disorders.

Peripheral neuropathy is a nerve disorder in dogs that affects multiple peripheral nerves. Unlike the protected nerves of the spine, the peripheral nerves are exposed to elements that come into contact with the dog’s body, leaving them more prone to toxic damage and physical injury. Peripheral nerves are spread throughout the body and are responsible for conscious movement, flow of the digestive system, and automatic physical responses.

Numerous conditions are linked to peripheral neuropathy, or the degeneration of the sheath which protects the peripheral nerves. Examples include an underactive thyroid gland, autonomic movement disorder affecting motor and sensorimotor nerves, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, and sensory nerve disorders.