Surgical Options at Elmhurst Animal Care Center

Accessing Pet Health Records with Petly

 

Elmhurst Animal Care Center pic
Elmhurst Animal Care Center
Image: elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com

A graduate of the University of Illinois, Joel Todd Leroy Prince, DVM, is a board certified small animal veterinarian. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince provides medical services at a number of animal hospitals and practices in the greater Chicago area, including the Elmhurst Animal Care Center.

The Elmhurst Animal Care Center maintains a variety of medical and grooming services streamlined by technology, including effective and simple management tools for pet health records. Utilizing Petly services, the care center is able to provide individuals and families with immediate access to their pet’s health records from the comfort of their own homes. Furthermore, Petly can be used to keep track of upcoming veterinarian appointments and to receive updates and messages regarding pet health directly from the doctor.

In order to access animal health records anytime, anywhere, owners must first sign up for a Petly account at no charge. This can be done by visiting www.petly.com or by contacting Elmhurst Animal Care Center at www.elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com or (630) 530-1900.

Twitch-Skin Syndrome in Cats

Twitch-Skin pic
Twitch-Skin
Image: petmd.com

As a board-certified small animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince treats both common and rare disorders in dogs and cats. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has a special interest in neurological disorders, such as feline hyperesthesia.

Also known as twitch-skin syndrome or twitchy-cat syndrome, feline hyperesthesia is an unusual disorder in which a cat’s back twitches from the shoulders to the tail. The phenomenon is visible in some cats, but others show it only through the behavior they exhibit in trying to stop the strange sensation.

The twitches of feline hyperesthesia typically happen episodically and can last from several seconds to a few minutes. An episode may first become apparent to an owner when the cat turns to look at his or her tail as though something has just bitten it.

Some cats bite at their backs or hiss at a perceived invisible attacker. Cats with severe cases may chew at their fur until they develop skin lesions and bald patches.

Veterinary science has not yet identified the source of feline hyperesthesia. Suspected causes include seizure disorders and behavioral issues. Cats that are particularly high-strung or subject to environmental stressors may be at a higher risk.

Stress reduction is a key component of treatment for this condition. Experts recommend feeding the cat a balanced diet rich in protein, but seeing a veterinarian for a specific treatment plan is the important first step.

Benefits of Routine Dental Care for Small Pets

 

Elmhurst Animal Care Center pic
Elmhurst Animal Care Center
Image: elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com

Based in Elmhurst, Illinois, veterinarian Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is one of only 15 animal care practitioners in the state to obtain diplomate status with the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is a long-time partner and staff veterinarian for Elmhurst Animal Care Center, a practice that provides a number of dental care services for pets.

Like humans, pets can become seriously ill due to poor dental health. Dogs and cats over the age of 3 are particularly susceptible to periodontal disease. Moreover, advanced dental problems can cause tooth loss and major organ failure.

Incorporating a professional dental cleaning into a pet’s annual health examination can help veterinarians identify dental problems early on and prevent them altogether by removing plaque buildup.

Owners can also follow a more frequent cleaning routine at home. Every day, dogs should chew on toys specially designed to reduce plaque. Pet owners can also use a variety of toothbrushes or bacteria-eliminating dental fluids to keep their pet’s mouth clean.

Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies in Dogs

Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies pic
Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies
Image: acvs.org

For 25 years, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has practiced as a board-certified veterinarian to small animals. Focused particularly on soft tissue surgical procedures, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince draws on a detailed knowledge of gastrointestinal foreign bodies as a health risk to dogs.

A gastrointestinal foreign body is any object that a dog may consume that does not pass easily through the digestive tract. These objects may cause a number of problems, from toxicities within the system to inflammation and bacterial contamination. Although some foreign bodies will naturally pass before causing any such symptoms, many will become stuck.

Blockage causes food and bodily fluids to accumulate behind the trapped object. This in turn imposes pressure on the blood vessels, which cannot supply the digestive tract with sufficient nutrients. This causes death of the gastrointestinal tissue and may lead to a tear, which allows for the spill of gastrointestinal contents into the abdomen and can cause a life-threatening condition known as sepsis.

The most common symptom of a gastrointestinal foreign body is vomiting, which occurs as the stomach contracts in an attempt to expel the offending item. Dogs may also display abdominal discomfort, diarrhea or difficulty passing stool, and a general lack of energy. These symptoms typically prompt a veterinarian to order blood tests and scans to assess for the presence of a foreign body, which he or she is likely to then remove surgically.

An Introduction to Feline Leukemia

Feline Leukemia pic
Feline Leukemia
Image: petmd.com

As a board-certified small animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince provides comprehensive care to dogs and cats. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince maintains a particular interest in veterinary cancers and their causal diseases.

Feline leukemia virus, or FeLV, is the most common cause of feline cancer as well as feline immunodeficiency. FeLV affects up to 3 percent of all cats that live in US homes with no other cats, though the risk is higher among kittens and cats that live with infected peers.

Feline leukemia is often asymptomatic in its earliest stages. As the disease progresses, however, a cat may begin to show symptoms that include appetite loss, weight loss, and enlarged lymph nodes.

Owners of cats with feline leukemia may notice problems with the coat, skin, and oral tissues, as well as persistent diarrhea and fever. Confirmation via a blood test typically is necessary for a veterinarian to arrive at a FeLV diagnosis.

Once the diagnosis is formalized, the veterinarian may recommend treatment for symptoms related to the disease. With monitoring and symptom mitigation, cats can live an average of 2.5 years with a good quality of life, though there is no cure for the disease itself.

The most responsible thing owners can do is to prevent their cats from getting the infection. A vaccination is available, but since it is not 100-percent effective, owners should keep their cats away from potentially infected animals.

Useful Tips for Keeping Your Dogs Safe at the Dog Park

Dog Park pic
Dog Park
Image: thebark.com

A member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is a board-certified veterinarian and medical partner at the Elmhurst Animal Center in western Chicago. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince leverages 25 years of experience to provide care to a wide range of companion animals, including dogs.

Dogs need to stay active in order to live happy, healthy lives, and one way that many dog owners choose to exercise their pets is through regular visits to the dog park. While dog parks can be an excellent opportunity for energetic play and socialization, owners should take steps ahead of time to best protect a pet’s health in this community setting.

Firstly, all dogs who enter a dog park should be up to date on vaccinations. The high volume of animals who visit dog parks make it easy for certain diseases to spread, such as dog flu and kennel cough. A dog that is current on vaccines is less likely to catch the more common illnesses transmitted in this setting.

To further prevent the spread of illness, owners should also bring a bowl from home to provide a dog with its own water to drink, as sharing water with sick dogs can also cause a pet to become sick. Additionally, owners should also consider using preventative tick and flea medication before bringing a pet to a dog park, as other canines may bring these parasites into the setting.