First Response Actions for Cat Seizures

Cat Seizures pic
Cat Seizures
Image: vetstreet.com

Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince serves as a veterinarian at several locations in and around Naperville, Illinois. With a strong background that includes board certification in small animal practice, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince focuses much of his practice on neurological disorders in dogs and cats.

As with humans and other animals, seizures in cats occur as a result of abnormal electromagnetic brain activity. Such events often manifest with unusual behavior, such as pacing or yowling, which is followed by the seizure itself, in which the cat collapses, stiffens, and enters convulsions that feature unusual movements.

When the cat wakes, it may continue to display postictal symptoms such as temporary paralysis and behavior changes. If a cat shows signs of an impending or an occurring seizure, the owner’s responsibility is to keep the cat safe until the seizure is over.

Staying as calm as possible, the owner should remove any potentially dangerous objects from the cat’s vicinity. If this is not possible, such when the cat near stairs, the owner may try to move the cat to a safe location.

Experts also recommend moving a seizing cat if the animal is on a table, bed, or other raised surface. If the seizure is in progress, the owner should be aware of the potential for uncontrolled scratching or biting.

Owners should then watch the cat to make sure that it stays safe throughout the seizure. If the seizure continues for more than three minutes or is immediately followed by another seizure, experts recommend that the owner call a veterinarian. When the seizure does stop, disorientation may cause the cat to act out, so the owner must continue to observe the cat to make sure it does not injure itself or others.

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