Preventing Parasites in Dogs

 

Parasites in Dogs pic
Parasites in Dogs
Image: petmd.com

As a board-certified small-animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince cares for dogs and cats in and around Elmhurst, Illinois. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince believes in preventive care, which includes guarding against internal parasites.

The prevention of internal parasites requires both owner diligence and regular veterinary care. Dog owners should connect with a local veterinarian to learn what parasites are common in their geographic area and what they should do to protect their dogs.

Many veterinarians conduct a fecal check on a dog’s first appointment and each year afterward. If the animal is at a high risk of parasites, the vet may recommend that the dog regularly take a preventive medication.

At home, owners need to prevent their dogs from eating feces, a canine habit that can cause the animals to take in parasites. Owners should keep their yards free of feces and keep their dogs away from standing water, which can breed parasites that cause severe digestive upset in dogs.

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What Causes Swollen and Bleeding Gums in Dogs?

Bleeding Gums  pic
Bleeding Gums
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A small animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince holds diplomate status with the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince treats animals at four clinics throughout Illinois, including Elmhurst Animal Care Center.

A full-service veterinary clinic, Elmhurst Animal Care Center is accredited by the Better Business Bureau and provides preventive care in addition to specialized services such as laser therapy, emergency services, and dental care.

Elmhurst Animal Care Center recommends dental exams for dogs who experience bad breath, missing teeth, loss of appetite, difficulty eating, or swollen or bleeding gums. Often, swollen or bleeding gums are due to poor oral health or periodontal disease. However, injuries from chewing toys or food can cause these symptoms as well. Further, consumption of toxic foods such as chocolate can also cause bleeding, as can other systemic diseases.

At Elmhurst Animal Care Center, doctors address oral health through an annual exam and regular cleanings.

Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies in Dogs

Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies pic
Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies
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For 25 years, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has practiced as a board-certified veterinarian to small animals. Focused particularly on soft tissue surgical procedures, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince draws on a detailed knowledge of gastrointestinal foreign bodies as a health risk to dogs.

A gastrointestinal foreign body is any object that a dog may consume that does not pass easily through the digestive tract. These objects may cause a number of problems, from toxicities within the system to inflammation and bacterial contamination. Although some foreign bodies will naturally pass before causing any such symptoms, many will become stuck.

Blockage causes food and bodily fluids to accumulate behind the trapped object. This in turn imposes pressure on the blood vessels, which cannot supply the digestive tract with sufficient nutrients. This causes death of the gastrointestinal tissue and may lead to a tear, which allows for the spill of gastrointestinal contents into the abdomen and can cause a life-threatening condition known as sepsis.

The most common symptom of a gastrointestinal foreign body is vomiting, which occurs as the stomach contracts in an attempt to expel the offending item. Dogs may also display abdominal discomfort, diarrhea or difficulty passing stool, and a general lack of energy. These symptoms typically prompt a veterinarian to order blood tests and scans to assess for the presence of a foreign body, which he or she is likely to then remove surgically.

Strategies for Protecting Dogs’ Joints

Dogs pic
Dogs
Image: petmd.com

Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has been practicing veterinary medicine for nearly 30 years. Board-certified in small animal care, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince maintains a particular focus on orthopedic care.

Dogs need their joints to stay healthy and whole so that they can run and jump without pain or hindrance, but the structures and the tissues that protect them can degrade with time, just like those in humans. Dog owners can help to counteract this process by making sure that their pets get plenty of exercise, particularly in their formative years (provided that this exercise is not so forceful that the dog is subject to injury).

Owners must also ensure that their dogs get all of the nutrients that they need to keep their joints strong. These nutrients occur naturally in a raw diet that contains bone matter, but most commercial dog foods today do not fall into this category. This being the case, supplements of glucosamine and hyaluronic acid can help to keep joints lubricated, while chondroitin supplements can support the repair of crucial cartilage.

Even with supplements, dogs need nutritious food in the correct quantities to prevent obesity, which can strain joints. If joints do become damaged, however, owners should seek treatment for their pets immediately to prevent worsening of the condition in both the short and the long term. This involves not only veterinary care but also adapting the environment, including the introduction of pet stairs and ramps if necessary, so that the dog can rest its joints as much as possible during recovery periods.

Grooming and Trimming the Claws of Elderly Cats

Trimming the Claws pic
Trimming the Claws
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Board certified as a small-animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince sees many cats in his Elmhurst, Illinois-based practice. Emphasizing a personalized approach to care, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince stresses the importance of helping cats with their grooming as they grow older and less able to take care of themselves.

With cats now living significantly longer than they once did, those past age 11 frequently require additional care. One symptom of age is a lessening of the ability to retract the claws. Because of this, claws can easily get caught in carpets or furniture or can become overgrown and stick into the animal’s foot pads. With age, regular claw trimming, both at home and by the vet, becomes a must.

Cats also become less adept at grooming as they grow older. This may mean assisting them in wiping away discharge from the nose and the eyes. The best material to use for this is a cotton ball that has been slightly moistened with warm water. Older cats may also need help grooming their fur. A fine comb and a soft brush can be used to remove any loose hair and dirt and to stimulate the skin. Owners should be gentle when brushing, as older cats lose the padding of their earlier years. Grooming also presents an ideal time to look for sores and unusual bumps or lumps on the skin, which may indicate that a visit to the vet is in order.

An Introduction to Feline Leukemia

Feline Leukemia pic
Feline Leukemia
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As a board-certified small animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince provides comprehensive care to dogs and cats. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince maintains a particular interest in veterinary cancers and their causal diseases.

Feline leukemia virus, or FeLV, is the most common cause of feline cancer as well as feline immunodeficiency. FeLV affects up to 3 percent of all cats that live in US homes with no other cats, though the risk is higher among kittens and cats that live with infected peers.

Feline leukemia is often asymptomatic in its earliest stages. As the disease progresses, however, a cat may begin to show symptoms that include appetite loss, weight loss, and enlarged lymph nodes.

Owners of cats with feline leukemia may notice problems with the coat, skin, and oral tissues, as well as persistent diarrhea and fever. Confirmation via a blood test typically is necessary for a veterinarian to arrive at a FeLV diagnosis.

Once the diagnosis is formalized, the veterinarian may recommend treatment for symptoms related to the disease. With monitoring and symptom mitigation, cats can live an average of 2.5 years with a good quality of life, though there is no cure for the disease itself.

The most responsible thing owners can do is to prevent their cats from getting the infection. A vaccination is available, but since it is not 100-percent effective, owners should keep their cats away from potentially infected animals.

Elmhurst Animal Care Center Coupons and Promotions

A board-certified practitioner of veterinary medicine, Joel Todd Leroy Prince, DVM, manages activities at the Elmhurst Animal Care Center as partner. In this position, Joel Todd Leroy Prince, DVM, not only spends time caring for animals, but oversees business operations with a goal of attracting new clients and fully satisfying the center’s existing customer base.

The Elmhurst Animal Care Center provides pet owners with a wide array of services, and wants new clients to be able to take full advantage of this care. With this in mind, new clients are offered a variety of promotions and coupons. One of the most popular promotions is the new patient microchipping special for pet identification, which allows pet owners to take advantage of a free microchipping procedure during their pet’s first examination. The offer is only valid, however, after owners have printed a Free Microchip coupon from the care center’s website, www.elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com.

Other Elmhurst coupons entitle new clients to a free night of pet boarding or 50 percent off pet grooming services. As a show of appreciation to longtime clients, the care center also runs various promotional offers open to all pet owners. A complete list of ongoing coupons and promotional offers can be found online.