The Shelter Medicine Program in Illinois: An Overview

Elmhurst Animal Care Center Provides Pulse Oximetry Services

pexels-photo-1350591Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is a board certified small animal veterinarian that holds over 30 years of experience in preventive care for animals. A graduate of the University of Illinois, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince currently serves as a partner at the Elmhurst Animal Care Center in Illinois.

Elmhurst Animal Care Center provides full comprehensive veterinary services to companion animals, seven days a week. The center offers care for animals at any stage of life, with advanced services ranging from ultrasounds and digital radiography to magnetic resonance imaging and pulse oximetry tests.

Also known as a blood oxygen test, pulse oximetry

measures oxygen saturation in the blood. Pulse oximetry is often used during surgical operations or following medical procedures. In addition, the test can help assess the health of a patient following a heart attack or other condition that affects the level of oxygen in the blood. The test employs a small probe to measure blood oxygen. The probe, which is typically placed on an ear or other body part, utilizes light to measure oxygen in the blood.

Surgical Options at Elmhurst Animal Care Center

Accessing Pet Health Records with Petly

 

Elmhurst Animal Care Center pic
Elmhurst Animal Care Center
Image: elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com

A graduate of the University of Illinois, Joel Todd Leroy Prince, DVM, is a board certified small animal veterinarian. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince provides medical services at a number of animal hospitals and practices in the greater Chicago area, including the Elmhurst Animal Care Center.

The Elmhurst Animal Care Center maintains a variety of medical and grooming services streamlined by technology, including effective and simple management tools for pet health records. Utilizing Petly services, the care center is able to provide individuals and families with immediate access to their pet’s health records from the comfort of their own homes. Furthermore, Petly can be used to keep track of upcoming veterinarian appointments and to receive updates and messages regarding pet health directly from the doctor.

In order to access animal health records anytime, anywhere, owners must first sign up for a Petly account at no charge. This can be done by visiting www.petly.com or by contacting Elmhurst Animal Care Center at www.elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com or (630) 530-1900.

What Is a Well-Balanced Diet for Dogs?

Twitch-Skin Syndrome in Cats

Twitch-Skin pic
Twitch-Skin
Image: petmd.com

As a board-certified small animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince treats both common and rare disorders in dogs and cats. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has a special interest in neurological disorders, such as feline hyperesthesia.

Also known as twitch-skin syndrome or twitchy-cat syndrome, feline hyperesthesia is an unusual disorder in which a cat’s back twitches from the shoulders to the tail. The phenomenon is visible in some cats, but others show it only through the behavior they exhibit in trying to stop the strange sensation.

The twitches of feline hyperesthesia typically happen episodically and can last from several seconds to a few minutes. An episode may first become apparent to an owner when the cat turns to look at his or her tail as though something has just bitten it.

Some cats bite at their backs or hiss at a perceived invisible attacker. Cats with severe cases may chew at their fur until they develop skin lesions and bald patches.

Veterinary science has not yet identified the source of feline hyperesthesia. Suspected causes include seizure disorders and behavioral issues. Cats that are particularly high-strung or subject to environmental stressors may be at a higher risk.

Stress reduction is a key component of treatment for this condition. Experts recommend feeding the cat a balanced diet rich in protein, but seeing a veterinarian for a specific treatment plan is the important first step.

Benefits of Routine Dental Care for Small Pets

 

Elmhurst Animal Care Center pic
Elmhurst Animal Care Center
Image: elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com

Based in Elmhurst, Illinois, veterinarian Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is one of only 15 animal care practitioners in the state to obtain diplomate status with the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is a long-time partner and staff veterinarian for Elmhurst Animal Care Center, a practice that provides a number of dental care services for pets.

Like humans, pets can become seriously ill due to poor dental health. Dogs and cats over the age of 3 are particularly susceptible to periodontal disease. Moreover, advanced dental problems can cause tooth loss and major organ failure.

Incorporating a professional dental cleaning into a pet’s annual health examination can help veterinarians identify dental problems early on and prevent them altogether by removing plaque buildup.

Owners can also follow a more frequent cleaning routine at home. Every day, dogs should chew on toys specially designed to reduce plaque. Pet owners can also use a variety of toothbrushes or bacteria-eliminating dental fluids to keep their pet’s mouth clean.

Preventing Parasites in Dogs

 

Parasites in Dogs pic
Parasites in Dogs
Image: petmd.com

As a board-certified small-animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince cares for dogs and cats in and around Elmhurst, Illinois. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince believes in preventive care, which includes guarding against internal parasites.

The prevention of internal parasites requires both owner diligence and regular veterinary care. Dog owners should connect with a local veterinarian to learn what parasites are common in their geographic area and what they should do to protect their dogs.

Many veterinarians conduct a fecal check on a dog’s first appointment and each year afterward. If the animal is at a high risk of parasites, the vet may recommend that the dog regularly take a preventive medication.

At home, owners need to prevent their dogs from eating feces, a canine habit that can cause the animals to take in parasites. Owners should keep their yards free of feces and keep their dogs away from standing water, which can breed parasites that cause severe digestive upset in dogs.

What Causes Swollen and Bleeding Gums in Dogs?

Bleeding Gums  pic
Bleeding Gums
Image: webmd.com

A small animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince holds diplomate status with the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince treats animals at four clinics throughout Illinois, including Elmhurst Animal Care Center.

A full-service veterinary clinic, Elmhurst Animal Care Center is accredited by the Better Business Bureau and provides preventive care in addition to specialized services such as laser therapy, emergency services, and dental care.

Elmhurst Animal Care Center recommends dental exams for dogs who experience bad breath, missing teeth, loss of appetite, difficulty eating, or swollen or bleeding gums. Often, swollen or bleeding gums are due to poor oral health or periodontal disease. However, injuries from chewing toys or food can cause these symptoms as well. Further, consumption of toxic foods such as chocolate can also cause bleeding, as can other systemic diseases.

At Elmhurst Animal Care Center, doctors address oral health through an annual exam and regular cleanings.

Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies in Dogs

Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies pic
Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies
Image: acvs.org

For 25 years, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has practiced as a board-certified veterinarian to small animals. Focused particularly on soft tissue surgical procedures, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince draws on a detailed knowledge of gastrointestinal foreign bodies as a health risk to dogs.

A gastrointestinal foreign body is any object that a dog may consume that does not pass easily through the digestive tract. These objects may cause a number of problems, from toxicities within the system to inflammation and bacterial contamination. Although some foreign bodies will naturally pass before causing any such symptoms, many will become stuck.

Blockage causes food and bodily fluids to accumulate behind the trapped object. This in turn imposes pressure on the blood vessels, which cannot supply the digestive tract with sufficient nutrients. This causes death of the gastrointestinal tissue and may lead to a tear, which allows for the spill of gastrointestinal contents into the abdomen and can cause a life-threatening condition known as sepsis.

The most common symptom of a gastrointestinal foreign body is vomiting, which occurs as the stomach contracts in an attempt to expel the offending item. Dogs may also display abdominal discomfort, diarrhea or difficulty passing stool, and a general lack of energy. These symptoms typically prompt a veterinarian to order blood tests and scans to assess for the presence of a foreign body, which he or she is likely to then remove surgically.