Elmhurst Animal Care Center Provides Pulse Oximetry Services

pexels-photo-1350591Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is a board certified small animal veterinarian that holds over 30 years of experience in preventive care for animals. A graduate of the University of Illinois, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince currently serves as a partner at the Elmhurst Animal Care Center in Illinois.

Elmhurst Animal Care Center provides full comprehensive veterinary services to companion animals, seven days a week. The center offers care for animals at any stage of life, with advanced services ranging from ultrasounds and digital radiography to magnetic resonance imaging and pulse oximetry tests.

Also known as a blood oxygen test, pulse oximetry

measures oxygen saturation in the blood. Pulse oximetry is often used during surgical operations or following medical procedures. In addition, the test can help assess the health of a patient following a heart attack or other condition that affects the level of oxygen in the blood. The test employs a small probe to measure blood oxygen. The probe, which is typically placed on an ear or other body part, utilizes light to measure oxygen in the blood.

How Donations Help Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois

 

Veterinary Medicine pic
Veterinary Medicine
Image: vetmed.illinois.edu

Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince, a partner at Elmhurst Animal Care Center, has practiced veterinary medicine for more than three decades. One way Joel Todd Leroy Prince gives back to the veterinary profession is by making at least one donation per year to the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine.

Donations to the University of Illinois give students access to high-quality research resources, ensuring they can contribute valuable new insights to the field and make the most of their time at the school. The university has a full-service, all-species diagnostic laboratory, providing support for immunologists, toxicologists, chemists, and other veterinary medicine specialists. Those interested in farm veterinary work have access to an 80-acre research farm.

The school also uses donations to fund its own research grants. Each year, many of the university’s programs, including the Animal Health and Disease Program, the Hatch program, and the Companion Animal Memorial Fund, provide funding to those who pass a competitive proposal process. Applications for university grants are subject to review by faculty serving on the school’s Research Advisory Committee.