Grooming and Trimming the Claws of Elderly Cats

Trimming the Claws pic
Trimming the Claws
Image: petmd.com

Board certified as a small-animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince sees many cats in his Elmhurst, Illinois-based practice. Emphasizing a personalized approach to care, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince stresses the importance of helping cats with their grooming as they grow older and less able to take care of themselves.

With cats now living significantly longer than they once did, those past age 11 frequently require additional care. One symptom of age is a lessening of the ability to retract the claws. Because of this, claws can easily get caught in carpets or furniture or can become overgrown and stick into the animal’s foot pads. With age, regular claw trimming, both at home and by the vet, becomes a must.

Cats also become less adept at grooming as they grow older. This may mean assisting them in wiping away discharge from the nose and the eyes. The best material to use for this is a cotton ball that has been slightly moistened with warm water. Older cats may also need help grooming their fur. A fine comb and a soft brush can be used to remove any loose hair and dirt and to stimulate the skin. Owners should be gentle when brushing, as older cats lose the padding of their earlier years. Grooming also presents an ideal time to look for sores and unusual bumps or lumps on the skin, which may indicate that a visit to the vet is in order.

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An Introduction to Feline Leukemia

Feline Leukemia pic
Feline Leukemia
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As a board-certified small animal veterinarian, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince provides comprehensive care to dogs and cats. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince maintains a particular interest in veterinary cancers and their causal diseases.

Feline leukemia virus, or FeLV, is the most common cause of feline cancer as well as feline immunodeficiency. FeLV affects up to 3 percent of all cats that live in US homes with no other cats, though the risk is higher among kittens and cats that live with infected peers.

Feline leukemia is often asymptomatic in its earliest stages. As the disease progresses, however, a cat may begin to show symptoms that include appetite loss, weight loss, and enlarged lymph nodes.

Owners of cats with feline leukemia may notice problems with the coat, skin, and oral tissues, as well as persistent diarrhea and fever. Confirmation via a blood test typically is necessary for a veterinarian to arrive at a FeLV diagnosis.

Once the diagnosis is formalized, the veterinarian may recommend treatment for symptoms related to the disease. With monitoring and symptom mitigation, cats can live an average of 2.5 years with a good quality of life, though there is no cure for the disease itself.

The most responsible thing owners can do is to prevent their cats from getting the infection. A vaccination is available, but since it is not 100-percent effective, owners should keep their cats away from potentially infected animals.

Elmhurst Animal Care Center Coupons and Promotions

A board-certified practitioner of veterinary medicine, Joel Todd Leroy Prince, DVM, manages activities at the Elmhurst Animal Care Center as partner. In this position, Joel Todd Leroy Prince, DVM, not only spends time caring for animals, but oversees business operations with a goal of attracting new clients and fully satisfying the center’s existing customer base.

The Elmhurst Animal Care Center provides pet owners with a wide array of services, and wants new clients to be able to take full advantage of this care. With this in mind, new clients are offered a variety of promotions and coupons. One of the most popular promotions is the new patient microchipping special for pet identification, which allows pet owners to take advantage of a free microchipping procedure during their pet’s first examination. The offer is only valid, however, after owners have printed a Free Microchip coupon from the care center’s website, www.elmhurstanimalcarecenter.com.

Other Elmhurst coupons entitle new clients to a free night of pet boarding or 50 percent off pet grooming services. As a show of appreciation to longtime clients, the care center also runs various promotional offers open to all pet owners. A complete list of ongoing coupons and promotional offers can be found online.

Signs of Polyneuropathy in Canines

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Polyneuropathy
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A University of Illinois alumnus, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince has practiced veterinary medicine since 1984. A partner at Elmhurst Animal Care Center, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince practices preventive care and has expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders in dogs.

A neurological disorder is a condition that can affect a dog’s brain, nerves, and spinal cord. These disorders, and the ensuing dysfunction, are typically due to an injury or infection of the central or peripheral nervous systems.

Also known as peripheral neuropathy, polyneuropathy is an example of a neurological disorder that affects the peripheral nervous system. Signs of the condition can be varied since peripheral nerves extend throughout a dog’s body. Symptoms include the loss of motor skills, such as reflexes, and low muscle tone. Disorientation, dizziness, and dysfunction of the pain and pleasure receptors can also occur. Moreover, the thyroid gland can be affected, which is sometimes evident by paralysis of the face, throat, esophagus, and voice box.

Useful Tips for Keeping Your Dogs Safe at the Dog Park

Dog Park pic
Dog Park
Image: thebark.com

A member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince is a board-certified veterinarian and medical partner at the Elmhurst Animal Center in western Chicago. Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince leverages 25 years of experience to provide care to a wide range of companion animals, including dogs.

Dogs need to stay active in order to live happy, healthy lives, and one way that many dog owners choose to exercise their pets is through regular visits to the dog park. While dog parks can be an excellent opportunity for energetic play and socialization, owners should take steps ahead of time to best protect a pet’s health in this community setting.

Firstly, all dogs who enter a dog park should be up to date on vaccinations. The high volume of animals who visit dog parks make it easy for certain diseases to spread, such as dog flu and kennel cough. A dog that is current on vaccines is less likely to catch the more common illnesses transmitted in this setting.

To further prevent the spread of illness, owners should also bring a bowl from home to provide a dog with its own water to drink, as sharing water with sick dogs can also cause a pet to become sick. Additionally, owners should also consider using preventative tick and flea medication before bringing a pet to a dog park, as other canines may bring these parasites into the setting.

Adipose Tumors in Pets

Adipose Tumors pic
Adipose Tumors
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Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince brings over 25 years of experience to his role as a veterinarian at several animal care clinics in Illinois, including as a partner with Elmhurst Animal Care Center. To stay up-to-date with the latest in veterinary science, Dr. Joel Todd Leroy Prince attends continuing education classes in excess of 100 hours every year. He takes a special interest in veterinary oncology.

Adipose, or lipoma, tumors grow in the fat tissue of many pets. Most common in older dogs, especially Labrador retrievers, lipomas are twice as likely to appear in female than male dogs. Cats get this type of tumor rarely, but any obese pet is at a higher risk.

Most adipose tumors are benign and tend to grow slowly enough that they don’t necessarily cause other problems. Benign adipose tumors can sometimes grow large enough to cause pain or problems with other tissues in the body, and can usually be surgically removed successfully. Rarely, this type of tumor will metastasize to other parts of the pet’s body. Liposarcomas are malignant adipose tumors that may be surgically removed, but can recur in the same place later.

Pets with suspected adipose tumors will need a biopsy to discover whether the tumor is malignant or benign and to decide on the best course of treatment for the individual pet.

Diplomates with the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners